Changing Motorcycles

I had extreme difficulties keeping my Harley Ultra Limited upright at stops. I finally admitted to myself that the bike was simply too tall and heavy for me to continue beating my head on the wall, or the pavement. I was heading for an injury if I didn’t relent.
I made arrangements to sell the bike and wandered into the used bike department to kill some time. This was like a visit to the animal shelter for a person who had just lost a pet.
This bike stood tall and picked me. It’s a 2011 Harley Softail Deluxe, a model that’s a favorite among women riders. The seat is only 26 inches off the ground and has a very low center of gravity, making it easy to keep upright.
I know when I’m licked (pun intended) and realized that my love affair with motorcycles can continue. This is my new Girl.


I’ve developed excellent riding skills and I find that I may have been taking too many risks. I love to lean my Ultra over in a curve, to the point of scraping the foot boards. I’ve come to understand that any unforeseen hazard in the roadway might result in a crash.
So, my new Girl and I are learning how to ride all over again. First off, she won’t let me lean like that. It doesn’t take much lean for her to protest and tell me to knock off the daredevil stuff.
I got a nice afternoon recently and rode Highway 6 west to the roundabout. Interstate 80 has replaced Highway 6, which was a major east-west mode of transportation.
I turned south and rode to Crete, Nebraska, then on to Wilber, DeWitt and to Beatrice. There was very little traffic and the sun shone brilliantly.
I love this little Girl and am whipping her around like she was a Honda 350. She loves to dance and has a wonderful soft, cushy ride.
I took Highway 77 north back to Lincoln and then decided to continue north to Highway 79, through Valparaiso and on to Highway 92. I stopped for gas in Weston, Nebraska and rode through Wahoo. I paid my respects to the phone booth which served as the World Headquarters for the David Letterman show for many years. Yes, look it up, it was a phone booth in Wahoo, Nebraska.
I was on a long curve to change roads and leaned over and accelerated, but the bike said, no-no, don’t do that. Her little foot boards hang low and scrape easily, to help train me to ride safe. I rolled off the throttle and slowed.
I finished the day with 180 miles for the afternoon. We have a lot of miles left to fully bond with each other, but so far it has been a wonderful experience.