Spring rides in Nebraska 2018

     
Having battled PMS (Parked Motorcycle Syndrome) for months, I finally broke out for EWT (Extreme Wind Therapy) last week. This has been a very long winter in Nebraska. When the forecast called for 2 days in a row with temps in the 70’s, I had to act.
 
I called in sick for 2 days in advance. (cough, cough), arranged for emergency feedings for my kittens and made a motel reservation in North Platte, 220 miles away.
 
It was a warm and sunny day when I left Lincoln. Well, warm is relative, it was 48 degrees, but it’s been icy and cold recently. I can ride very comfortably at 45 deg. F and up. I had my heated jacket liner, another liner for insulation and a very heavy leather Harley jacket. I added heated gloves, used the heated grips on the bike and wore a full-face helmet. I looked like the bride of Darth Vader. 🙂 Those who know me will say that my voice sounds like her, too. No offense to the real wife of DV. 🙂
 
I got onto Interstate 80 easily and navigated urban traffic until the sign said I could open it up a bit. Speed limit is 75. To those who travel through our wonderful Cornhusker state, our friendly local Nebraska State Troopers will nail you hard if you do 80 or faster. Every other state in which I’ve ever driven will leave you alone at 8 over the limit, but don’t even think about that in our fair land. Word to the wise.
 
But, I digress. I ran up to 78 mph, checked speed according to GPS to verify accuracy of speedometer and it was right on. Either that, or both devices are in error. I set the cruise control and waved at the Sheriff vehicle parked in the median. They let me go with a head start to the county line. This was going to be a wonderful day.
 
Traffic was fairly light for this stretch of road and most of the drivers were courteous and careful. I love that when on two wheels. A woman traveling alone must always be cautious and alert. An old lady must be even more so, as they present an easy target.
 
A great many women bikers relate great insecurity to travel solo on a bike. After all, you can’t exactly roll up the windows and lock the doors when feeling threatened. After many miles riding alone, I can say that I have great confidence in my personal safety. There appears to be considerable respect for anyone riding in full leathers on a Harley. I don’t know if others think this person might be armed or 300 of their closest friends are just over the next hill or what. I’m always treated with kindness and dignity by others, either in person or other vehicles.
 
I do my best driving on my bike. I let others in, I never forcibly insist on the right of way and quickly relinquish my position if required. When I see an 18 wheeler needing to change lanes, I quickly let off the gas and flash my lights to let them know it’s clear for them to move over. This is a universal trucker signal that everyone should know. After making their move, they’ll blink their tail lights as a thank you. Watching truckers operate will help reinforce this lesson. Always be kind to truckers, they are your best friend. However, if they have a sign on the back that says, “bikes flattened, while-u-wait”, you may assume otherwise. 🙂
 
Back to riding. The medians and ditches are just starting to turn green. The fields are barren, with only a few short stalks left from last year. The popularity of “no-till” farming has reduced airborne dust a lot. Quite a few farmers could be seen in tractors tending to their fields. This is an exciting time here in farmland.
 
As I approached Grand Island, 90 miles due west, I began to see Sandhill Cranes in the fields. They migrate from Central America, Mexico and even Florida on their way to their summer condos near the Arctic circle. They stop here along the Platte river to rest up and feed for several weeks before resuming their flights. This has gone on for thousands of years and it’s exciting to view these magnificent birds.
 
I turned off the Interstate and headed north through Grand Island. I stopped for gas so I’d have enough to complete my day’s ride. I was headed into some pretty lonesome territory from here.
 
I got on to U.S. Highway 2, the Sandhills Scenic Byway. This was native Nebraska prairie country. It is breathtakingly beautiful. I love riding out here.
13 miles down the road was Cairo, Nebraska. One of the great joys of open road bike riding is the fine dining opportunities afforded by small town bars. Small towns seldom have cafes or diners, but almost all of them have a bar. Dinner time in small town bars finds families gathered and often kids are present. This is the town gathering place.
 
I rolled up to “The Watering Hole” bar, which is featured on www.beckysbikerblog.com as one of “Becky’s Best Biker Bars and Cafes”. Their burgers are delightful.
 
Today’s special was Prime Rib Sandwich for $8.95. Are you kidding me? You’re lucky to get a bad burger and fries at a fast food place for that. This was real meat, unprocessed, from a real cow.
 
The great taste told me that the grill marks weren’t just painted on, they came off a real grill. It was great and so were the fries. I don’t eat many fries, but the prime rib was consumed in it’s entirety. It was so good. This is the way travel was meant to be.
 
I made conversation with the bartender, who is the proud owner of the other bike in the photo. He had just purchased it and said it needed a lot of work. He was extremely happy to own it and was learning to ride. I gave him 2 important riding tips and got back on the road.
 
I decided to take State Highway 11 straight south out of town to get back on the Interstate. I need to get to North Platte for a visit with friends.
 
The highway was classic rural Nebraska flatland. The road was nice and straight and flat as it could be. This was the Platte river valley. Every spring, the snow melt from the Rocky Mountains causes the Platte river to flood and over millions of years, a wide, flat valley has developed.
 
I was really enjoying this part of the ride and thinking to myself how remote and peaceful was this part of the trip. Suddenly, my inner joy was shattered at the sight of a sign that said “License and Registration Check Ahead”. Are you serious? This *is* the middle of nowhere. I should be able to ride in my underwear out here. Not that I would, I scare the cows. 🙂
 
I could see 2 State Patrol Cars parked off to the side of the road and several State Troopers were giving the car in front of me a real going over. They were inspecting the car and checking lights. Oh, my.
 
More to the story later in Part 2, Spring adventure in Nebraska.
 
 

Storing a motorcycle for the winter

 

 

There are 4 aspects to storing a bike. They are fuel, oil, battery and tires. First will be presented the short version of each (what time is it?). Following that will be the highly technical explanations of each, for those who want to know why (how to build a watch).

 

Fuel.  There are 2 different methods. First is to fill the tank with non-ethanol fuel and add a fuel preservative, such as “Stabil” or “Sea Foam”. Add the chemical at the gas pump, then ride the bike home to be certain the fuel in the rest of the system has the preservatives in it. Ride it to be sure it’s warmed up and then give it some hard acceleration to clean the spark plugs before parking it for the winter.

 

The second method is to drain the gas tank when the engine is hot, (see above on cleaning the spark plugs) then start and run the bike until it quits. This removes all fuel from the system, preventing damage from deteriorated fuel over the storage period.

 

Oil.  Park the bike and leave it. Whatever bad that will happen to the oil over the winter won’t matter, because you’ll change the oil in the spring and start the riding season with new oil. If you’re going to ride it periodically, then stick with your normal oil change schedule.

 

Note: Whatever you do, DON’T START THE BIKE AND LET IT SIT AND IDLE PERIODICALLY OVER THE WINTER. Park it or ride it, but don’t start it as a means of storage.

 

Battery. The best thing for a motorcycle battery is to be connected to a device designed to maintain the battery. The brand “Battery Tender” is generally recognized as the standard of the industry and the one sold by most motorcycle dealers. It’s designed to charge the battery periodically. Don’t use a battery charger, as that will simply slow cook the battery until its dead.

 

Even if you remove the battery from the bike and bring it in the house, it’s still advisable to use a battery tender on it occasionally to keep it fully charged.

 

Do NOT start the bike and run it to “recharge” the battery. This won’t help the battery and can be very hard on the engine.

 

Tires.  Don’t let the tires stand on concrete while in storage. Roll the tires onto some thin plywood pieces or plastic to prevent contact with rubber and concrete. Be sure the tires are properly inflated before storage. Re-check inflation before riding it in the spring.

 

Attention—Since our motorcycles are members of the family, it’s encouraged to pay attention to the bike from time to time. Cleaning, waxing and admiring will help keep the bike’s spirit up until the spring thaw. Remember, it’s OK to just sit and stare at your bike. That bitch is sexy.

 

Technical explanations (How to build a watch)

 

     Fuel.  Fuel degrades rapidly. It’s actually only “fresh” for days after you buy it. Storing the bike with a full tank will reduce the contact it has with air, which can aid in fuel preservation. Adding products like Stabil or Sea Foam will help prevent degradation of the fuel and subsequent damage to the motorcycle fuel system. Likewise, draining the entire system will also do the trick. If there’s no fuel, there’s less chance of damage.

 

Auto repair shops have reported substantial damage to fuel pumps from vehicles stored long term with ethanol fuel in the system. Ethanol can be corrosive and result in damage.

 

Oil.  Oil gets worn out from 4 things. The first is acid that develops when super-heated combustion gases from “blow-by” contact cold air in the crankcase. Blow-by is pressure that “blows by” the seal of  the piston rings. The metals in the engine change dimensions with temperature. Cold engine parts don’t work properly until full operating temperature is reached. The entire engine was designed to run at a specified temperature range. Cold parts are smaller.

 

Motor oils have to have additives to neutralize these acids. The more cold starts, the more additives that get used up. At some point, this causes the oil to become acidic and attack the seals and gaskets. This is where oil leaks come from.

 

The second thing is unburned gasoline that also gets past the piston rings and into the oil, diluting it with liquid fuel. An engine that’s had repeated short run times can actually be seen to have oil level that’s too high. I’ve seen a 4 quart system that was 2 quarts over full from this condition. This meant that the oil was too thin to lubricate and it turned on the oil light as a result.

 

The third thing is water from condensation on a cold start. Much water is formed when an engine is cold started. This can cause rust and corrosion, in addition to diluting the oil.

 

The fourth thing is running the engine for extended periods with oil temperatures below normal operating specifications. Getting the oil “up to temperature” means that the moisture and unburned fuel get evaporated away. Water boils at 212 degrees F. at sea level. The normal operating temperature of motorcycle oil is 180 to 220 degrees. It’s important to understand the most motorcycle engines are air cooled. They don’t have a thermostat to regulate temperature like a car. I used a dipstick that doubled as a thermometer to monitor oil temperature on my Harley Fat Boy over thousands of miles to better understand this. It took 10 to 20 miles of riding in cold weather just to begin to get the oil temperature close to specifications in winter temperatures. Idling never got it even close if the outside temp was cold.

 

For all these reasons, it’s just unwise to think that you can start the engine and run it from time to time and expect good things to happen. Let it sit, it’s far better for the oil and the engine.

 

Battery—It takes a long time (maybe several hours or more) of slow charging to bring a battery to a full state of charge. When a battery sits in less than a full charge, it sulfates and ages prematurely. Vehicle charging systems were not designed to perform this job in short operational periods.

 

This is the reason to use a solid state device designed to preserve a battery on your bike. Modern bikes have many drains on the battery. Security systems, the computers that run the ignition and fuel injection, the memory on the radio and more all use electricity to retain memory. This little draw is called “parasitic draw”.  Think of driving across the desert with a very small leak in the radiator of a car. It doesn’t matter how small the leak, sooner or later the system runs out of water and you’re done.

 

Even sitting on a shelf in a nice warm place in your home results in some current loss. This is why the battery needs to be connected to a tender from time to time even if you take it out and bring it inside.

 

This is the second reason you don’t start the bike from time to time to “recharge the battery”. It doesn’t really recharge the battery properly, anyway. This will only shorten the life of the battery and cause you to think that the brand of battery you have just isn’t a very good brand. The reality is, it was mistreated.

 

Tires.  When tires sit for extended periods on concrete, the chemicals within the tire that preserve the rubber get leached out into the concrete. Riding the bike and flexing the tires restores those chemicals back into the surface of the tire. For daily driving or regular use, this leaching process is negligible and not worthy of attention.

 

However, for long term storage, it’s best to prevent the rubber from contact with concrete. Anything will do, such as plywood, tile, plastic or hair.

 

Bikes aren’t heavy enough to really flat spot tires, so that’s no concern.

 

Fast Summary:  Fill the gas tank, add some chemicals, air the tires. Roll the bike onto plywood, hook up a battery tender, then cry your eyes out. Wine has been reported to be helpful to deal with PMS (Parked Motorcycle Syndrome).

 

—Becky Witt is an ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician (ASE CMAT). She is a nationally recognized expert on motor oils and has presented classes on motor oils for shop owners and professional technicians at several International Events. She produced a DVD on motor oils and sold 200 copies to a major oil company. She owns an auto repair shop and has also taught many classes on repair shop management.

Becky’s Best Biker Bars and Cafes

One of the great rewards for riding a motorcycle is discovering the very neat places in small towns that welcome bikers. These often hard-to-find places offer great small town atmosphere, wonderful people and some really good american food.

 

If you’re traveling anywhere in or through Nebraska, check out Becky’s reviews and directory of fine biking experiences.

Fight Fatigue, Drink Water

Quick note:  You can now register on my site. On the right side, click on the link that says, “Register”.   Soon, I’ll get this figured out and be able to notify you when new material goes up. Thanks and Ride Safe.

Looking at my black draggin brand jeans, it’s plain to see white stains all over them. What are those from, you might ask?  Those are salt deposits from sweating like a hash cook over a hot grill in a kitchen with no windows.

 

Or, in this case, riding a motorcycle sitting on a very hot engine long enough to bring buns to a nice toasty finish.

It was stressed over and over on the Women’s Freedom Ride the need to drink lots of water. I’m not one to drink much water and I returned from a 3 day ride earlier this year and felt awful the day after. All day long, I felt drug out and run over. I now think it was dehydration.

 

At every fuel stop, which is roughly every 2 hours on a road bike, I made it a point to drink a bottle of water and the same at lunch. I never did feel poorly even after 14 days of riding, even in high heat. This is now part of my regimen and I keep bottles of water in my saddlebags.

 

I also feel free to salt my food liberally. I can see I’m getting rid of it, so my main worry is having enough of it in my body.

 

Ride on, Wind Sisters.

Believe you can ride a motorcycle

New, Part 11 in My Experiences With the Women’s Freedom Ride. See the Freedom Ride tab, lower right on this page.

One of the most difficult aspects of being a woman who wants to ride a motorcycle is all the doubt placed in your head by others. We expect this from men, but women can play this, as well. If everyone you meet all day says, “Gee, you look tired”, pretty soon you’re going to feel tired. This is simple auto suggestion.

 

When people suggest that you can’t learn to ride a motorcycle, it sinks deep into your subconscious and eventually, you may come to believe that you can’t. I’ve met too many women who commented on thinking they couldn’t because (pick one), too old, too heavy, too light, too short, I’m over 35, 40, 50, 60, 70. 70? Yes, women can still learn to ride a big bike at 70. We had a woman on the Women’s Freedom Ride at age 76 and another at 70.

 

Here’s my point. If you want to do something, you must first believe that you can do it. If you want to learn to ride a motorcycle, create a paper ride permit for yourself. Carry a copy with you and look at it often. Put another copy on the bathroom mirror. Look at it every day. Tell yourself that you WILL have a real one, with your name on it.

 

If you want to own a motorcycle, or a certain one, do the same thing. Take a picture of it and carry it with you. See yourself, through your own eyes, riding that bike. Close your eyes every night feeling the wind in your hair and enjoy the smells of the country, believing you’ll soon be riding that bike.

 

Next, take action. Resolve to save up the money to do it. Begin to make a meal planning list for all the meals you’ll serve in the next week. Then go through the kitchen and make a list of the ingredients you’ll need to cook those meals. Write the meals out on the fridge and cross them off as you cook them. This will save you so much money on groceries, you won’t believe it. Take the extra money and stash it. You’ll not only accumulate the down payment, you’ll soon be able to make the payments.

 

Fix coffee at home, give up that $5 latte every day. Same with lunches. Believe, understand and make it happen. I’ve seen far too many people tell me they have no money, while holding a large Starbucks cup and wearing all designer label clothes with a Coach purse. Truth is, they let money control them.

 

Finally, when some guy puts you down because you’re riding a “small bike”, ask what he rides. Most of the time these losers only have a Schwinn.

 

I hope this messages helps some of you achieve a dream, whether it’s being able to ride, buy a bike or go on a long biker trip. If you can believe it, you can really do it. One year ago today, I didn’t own a bike.  Let that sink in for a minute.

 

Now, get out and ride.